Cassandra

Cassandra

description

sculpture upcycled materials; varnish glue Giraffe inhabits African savannah and open woodlands. It is the tallest existing terrestrial animal. Traditionally it was considered a single species divided into nine subspecies, however latest research shows that it should be recognized as multiple species. Currently a number of them is listed as endangered. In the last 15 years there has been a drop of more than 40 percent in their population numbers. Genetic evidence indicates that there were seven other extinct species of giraffe that are known only by fossils. The name “giraffe” has Arabic origins meaning “fast walker”. Giraffes can either walk or gallop, reaching speeds of up to 60 km/h (37 mph). Adult giraffes can reach almost 6 meters (or 19 feet) in height, with males being taller than females. Their tongue can be as long as 45 cm (18 inches), and both it and the upper lip are prehensile. Their tail is about 1 meter (3 feet) long. Giraffes’ eyes provide an almost 360o vision, and can see colour. Coats of male giraffes darken as they grow older. Giraffes mostly sleep lying down. A long neck of a giraffe accounts for major part of the animal’s height. Its length is created by the length of the cervical vertebrae, and not by their increased number. They are over 28 cm (11 inches) long. The elongation of the vertebrae largely occurs after birth. Giraffes have gestation periods of 15 months. Newborn giraffes are as tall as an adult human, and weight around 50-70 kg (110- 150 lbs). They double in size in the first year of their lives. Giraffes are highly social animals, and tend to form strong long-term connections. They are not territorial, and their groups are often segregated by gender. While giraffes do not usually produce many sounds, they do employ a wide variety of subtle sounds such as coughs and snorts, as well as body movements, to communicate. At nighttime they appear to hum to each other in an infrasound range. The purpose of this hum is currently unknown. Conservation status: vulnerable to extinction. Threats to existence: habitat loss, habitat fragmentation, poaching